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Ahmaud Arbery. Results are in!

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2 hours ago, DoubleBlueGold said:

They would not have been arrested, if the Greg Floyd protest had not occurred. If I am remembering correctly, they were not charged nor arrested for several months. 

They deserve to be locked up.

Not quite. They weren't charged for 70-something days, that part is right. And they would not have been charged had a video showing the murder had not been leaked to the media. The outcry after that did put pressure to bring charges. It was a national story all on its own. But all of that happened before Floyd was murdered.

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2 hours ago, SalinasSpartan said:

I don’t support the death penalty, but right now I feel like the old lady juror in my cousin Vinny that says “fry em”. 

Come on the Carr brothers need fried. These guys get what they deserve but are no where in the same category of some of the murders we have sitting in prison. And it’s not even close. 
 

 

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3 hours ago, halfmanhalfbronco said:

All three men are going behind bars for a long, long time.  

Great outcome.  The only outcome.  

I'm not a fan of the felony murder charge against Roddie Bryan.  I think his actions were more misdemeanor-like.  And even though the older McMichael is a racist POS (per his statements) I don't think his behavior of sitting in the back of the truck rose to the level of felony murder.  The young McMichael who was driving the truck and got out with the shotgun is really the deplorable one.

Frankly I think these laws are felony murder laws are really dumb and responsible for the long-term incarceration of many not-very-violent young men.

Quote

 Felony murder is you don't necessarily want to kill someone but you're committing a felony offense and someone dies as a result of it," Pate said.

 

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41 minutes ago, NVGiant said:

Not quite. They weren't charged for 70-something days, that part is right. And they would not have been charged had a video showing the murder had not been leaked to the media. The outcry after that did put pressure to bring charges. It was a national story all on its own. But all of that happened before Floyd was murdered.

If the DA had seen that video and still chose to not press charges then that was white supremacy in Georgia at work.  I don't remember if the DA had seen the video or not before it was leaked.

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2 minutes ago, bsu_alum9 said:

I'm not a fan of the felony murder charge against Roddie Bryan.  I think his actions were more misdemeanor-like.  And even though the older McMichael is a racist POS (per his statements) I don't think his behavior of sitting in the back of the truck rose to the level of felony murder.  The young McMichael who was driving the truck and got out with the shotgun is really the deplorable one.

Frankly I think these laws are felony murder laws are really dumb and responsible for the long-term incarceration of many not-very-violent young men.

 

 

You know, I pretty much agree in principle but Stare Decisis in Georgia makes it pretty clear, if you are in the act of committing a felony in a sequence of crimes that results in murder, your guilty.

@smltwnrckr thoughts please?  I see some parallels between this and our other conversation.

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5 minutes ago, halfmanhalfbronco said:

You know, I pretty much agree in principle but Stare Decisis in Georgia makes it pretty clear, if you are in the act of committing a felony in a sequence of crimes that results in murder, your guilty.

@smltwnrckr thoughts please?  I see some parallels between this and our other conversation.

You are absolutely right that it is clear in the law.  Many state's have the same laws regarding felony murder.  I just think it is unjust to do so.  My issue is with the state legislatures for passing those laws, not the legal system for enforcing them.

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1 minute ago, bsu_alum9 said:

You are absolutely right that it is clear in the law.  Many state's have the same laws regarding felony murder.  I just think it is unjust to do so.  My issue is with the state legislatures for passing those laws, not the legal system for enforcing them.

I would be interested in those who claim the law was correctly upheld in the Kyle case but maybe the law is incorrect if they will say the same here?

For some reason, I doubt it.  Teams and shit.

Per the Law, they got this 100% correct, and I have a hard time feeling too sorry for the elder McMichael or Bryan.  But, yeah.  @NVGiant I respect you more than most and saw you liking posts that while Kyle was right in the law, the law was wrong.  Do you feel similarly here, with these two murder convictions?  

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5 minutes ago, Bob said:

How did they get the video off of Bryan? Why would he save such a video. Sorry not familiar with this case.

In the words of Heywood from Shawshank Redemption, "lawyer f+++++ me"

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On May 7, Alan David Tucker, a local criminal defense attorney, said that he had sent the cell phone video to WGIG,[90][91] and that it had been recorded by William "Roddie" Bryan, who was in the second truck following Arbery.[40] WGIG confirmed that Tucker had provided the video to the radio station.[92] Tucker had informally consulted with the suspects in the case,[92] but said he had not been retained to represent anyone involved.[92][90] Tucker said that he released the video to provide "absolute transparency" due to "erroneous accusations and assumptions",[90] and that "my purpose was not to exonerate them or convict them."[92]

Roddie thought they were chaising a criminal and recorded for evidence to show the police. Ended up helping convict himself.  He hadn't communicated with the McMichaels previously.

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9 minutes ago, bsu_alum9 said:

In the words of Heywood from Shawshank Redemption, "lawyer f+++++ me"

Roddie thought they were chaising a criminal and recorded for evidence to show the police. Ended up helping convict himself.  He hadn't communicated with the McMichaels previously.

hmmm. So because he didn't try to stop the murder he goes to jail for a long long time. Even though he had no idea wtf was going on. harsh

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1 hour ago, halfmanhalfbronco said:

 

You know, I pretty much agree in principle but Stare Decisis in Georgia makes it pretty clear, if you are in the act of committing a felony in a sequence of crimes that results in murder, your guilty.

@smltwnrckr thoughts please?  I see some parallels between this and our other conversation.

I think self-deputized mobs carrying guns and killing people are bad. And I imagine state laws treat them differently both on paper and in practice. 

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On 11/24/2021 at 2:29 PM, halfmanhalfbronco said:

I would be interested in those who claim the law was correctly upheld in the Kyle case but maybe the law is incorrect if they will say the same here?

For some reason, I doubt it.  Teams and shit.

Per the Law, they got this 100% correct, and I have a hard time feeling too sorry for the elder McMichael or Bryan.  But, yeah.  @NVGiant I respect you more than most and saw you liking posts that while Kyle was right in the law, the law was wrong.  Do you feel similarly here, with these two murder convictions?  

Well, first it's a different state with different laws, of course. But here is how I explained it in the Rittenhouse thread: The defense was claiming "citizen's arrest" for a crime that doesn't appear to have been committed, much less committed by the victim, and claiming self defense for a confrontation with an unarmed man who they had no valid reason to confront. That would be problematic on its own.

Furthermore, under Georgia citizen's arrest law (which has been changed since because of this case), a citizen's arrest can be made “if the offense is committed in his presence or within his immediate knowledge,” or under reasonable grounds of suspicion if the crime is a felony. The defense did not meet that threshold.

As for Rittenhouse, I've been liking a lot of @smltwnrckr's posts because he brought up excellent questions. If the third guy, the one who did not die, had shot and killed Rittenhouse it seems he too would be able to use the same defense as Rittenhouse. Could it be that both were acting in self defense under the law, and if so, is that problematic? Does that mean that anyone can drop themselves into a similar situation armed and reasonably expect a similar judgement if things go similarly bad? And what signal does that send, if that is indeed the case? I hadn't really thought of all that before, mostly because I hadn't really thought much of the case before the verdict, but I think those are interesting questions.

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37 minutes ago, Bob said:

hmmm. So because he didn't try to stop the murder he goes to jail for a long long time. Even though he had no idea wtf was going on. harsh

The felony counts he was convicted on were aggravated assault, false imprisonment, and criminal attempt to commit a felony.  So because their was a death during the commission of those - he goes away.  I doubt his sentence will be more than 5 years, but still a long time.

Basically just for cornering the victim with his truck.  Definitely harsh.

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