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Knowing what we know now, we need to take war power away from Congress/Potus and put it back into the hands of the people, we should do like we do everything else, vote on it, we've known for how many years it can't be trusted in their hands?

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36 minutes ago, Rocket said:

Knowing what we know now, we need to take war power away from Congress/Potus and put it back into the hands of the people, we should do like we do everything else, vote on it, we've known for how many years it can't be trusted in their hands?

I don't believe war powers were every in the hands of the populace.  It's always been a power of the congress to declare war.  

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On 10/13/2021 at 9:30 AM, happycamper said:

I'd argue that the rising wages and working conditions are a correction from the far worse economic issues we have just decided to accept as normal.

How much of a raise would you need to buy your current house today, for example?

Gas prices are also a factor in inflation which Biden is directly responsible for. There’s less oil on the world market thanks to Biden, and that makes the price rise sharply and make enemies of ours like Putin roll in current and short term projected cash.

Biden let Putin’s Nord Stream 2 pipe line move forward to completion and he shut down ours. Who does he work for again? I thought Trump was the Russian agent/shill as our resident lefty’s so cluelessly spout. Trump was for our pipe line and had shut down Putin’s indefinitely. Common sense if you work for sane Americans. 

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7 hours ago, HR_Poke said:

I don't believe war powers were every in the hands of the populace.  It's always been a power of the congress to declare war.  

Declaring war is old school. We didn’t even declare war in Vietnam. That’s why it was called the Vietnam Conflict. Korea? Nope. WWII was the last time we formally declared war on anyone. 

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3 minutes ago, Nevada Convert said:

Gas prices are also a factor in inflation which Biden is directly responsible for. There’s less oil on the world market thanks to Biden, and that makes the price rise sharply and make enemies of ours like Putin roll in current and short term projected cash.

Biden let Putin’s Nord Stream 2 pipe line move forward to completion and he shut down ours. Who does he work for again? I thought Trump was the Russian agent/shill as our resident lefty’s so cluelessly spout. Trump was for our pipe line and had shut down Putin’s indefinitely. Common sense if you work for sane Americans. 

Convert. I worked in and then with the energy sector for about 10 years. If there was any President who could even possibly be "directly responsible" for changing the cost of gas, they would be the most powerful President since FDR. 

Furthermore, the idea that gas prices are a factor in inflation is hilarious. We paid far higher gas prices in 2008 and for pretty much all of 2011-2015, and we paid roughly equivalent gas prices for 2018-2019. We didn't see inflation be pushed much, if at all, then. Hence your thesis that gas prices would be a noticeable factor is disproven by recent history. 

 

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3 hours ago, Nevada Convert said:

Gas prices are also a factor in inflation which Biden is directly responsible for. There’s less oil on the world market thanks to Biden, and that makes the price rise sharply and make enemies of ours like Putin roll in current and short term projected cash.

Biden let Putin’s Nord Stream 2 pipe line move forward to completion and he shut down ours. Who does he work for again? I thought Trump was the Russian agent/shill as our resident lefty’s so cluelessly spout. Trump was for our pipe line and had shut down Putin’s indefinitely. Common sense if you work for sane Americans. 

What pipeline?  You mean Keystone that was going to be built to mainly export gas and oil?

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3 hours ago, Wyobraska said:

What pipeline?  You mean Keystone that was going to be built to mainly export gas and oil?

Do you understand the oil market at all? That’s exactly what it would’ve done and when you put more supply on the world market with roughly the same demand, the price goes down, junior. 

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2 minutes ago, Nevada Convert said:

Do you understand the oil market at all? That’s exactly what it would’ve done and when you put more supply on the world market with roughly the same demand, the price goes down, junior. 

I don't think it would have been the savior you thought it would be.  

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23 hours ago, happycamper said:

Convert. I worked in and then with the energy sector for about 10 years. If there was any President who could even possibly be "directly responsible" for changing the cost of gas, they would be the most powerful President since FDR. 

Furthermore, the idea that gas prices are a factor in inflation is hilarious. We paid far higher gas prices in 2008 and for pretty much all of 2011-2015, and we paid roughly equivalent gas prices for 2018-2019. We didn't see inflation be pushed much, if at all, then. Hence your thesis that gas prices would be a noticeable factor is disproven by recent history. 

 

“Overall though, higher gas prices raise the risk of stagflation - high inflation, low growth.“

Energy stud, You you so clueless, it’s mind boggling. You’ve got to be kidding. A business major you weren’t. Let’s use a really simple example that even you might be able to understand. Anytime costs increase for a company to operate, with everything else remaining the same, they have to pass those costs on to the consumer with higher prices.

If Bill has a pizza delivery business, he has to pay more for his drivers to deliver the pizza, so he has to raise his price for pizza. Then when the delivery truck shows up with the ingredients he needs to make his pizza, and he sees the bill going up every week for the same items because other companies have to pass on increased fuel costs, he has to raise his even more.

Then Winter comes and diesel and heating oil compete directly. With oil prices rising anyway, then heating oil demand competes with diesel causing both prices to go up. Now his heating bill just to keep his business going goes up as well which is seasonal, but the oil prices on the world market make it go up even more. So Bill has to pass that cost on to his customers, as well. That’s called inflation, Gilligan.

https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/global-markets-gas-2021-09-20/

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9 hours ago, Wyobraska said:

I don't think it would have been the savior you thought it would be.  

Savior?, it was going to do what it was expected to do which would’ve been as predictable as the sun coming up. Duh.

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8 hours ago, Nevada Convert said:

“Overall though, higher gas prices raise the risk of stagflation - high inflation, low growth.“

Energy stud, You you so clueless, it’s mind boggling. You’ve got to be kidding. A business major you weren’t. Let’s use a couple of really simple examples that even you might be able to understand. Anytime costs increase for a company to operate, with everything else remaining the same, they have to pass those costs on to the consumer with higher prices.

If Bill has a pizza delivery business, he has to pay more for his drivers to deliver the pizza, so he has to raise his price for pizza. Then when the delivery truck shows up with the ingredients he needs to make his pizza, and he sees the bill going up every week for the same items because other companies have to pass on increased fuel costs, he has to raise his even more.

Then Winter comes and diesel and heating oil compete directly. With oil prices rising anyway, then heating oil demand competes with diesel causing both prices to go up. Now his heating bill just to keep his business going goes up as well which is seasonal, but the oil prices on the world market make it go up even more. So Bill has to pass that cost on to his customers, as well. That’s called inflation, Gilligan.

https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/global-markets-gas-2021-09-20/

Convert. Everybody knows that rising gas prices marginally increase other costs. We just also know that the inflation risk for gas prices rising and staying even higher than they are no is essentially zero,  because,  uh, we already did that. 

Talk about new car costs.  Talk about food costs.  Talk about wages. Talk about housing. Talk about medical costs.  But... gas? Good lord con. We've been at this price for four of the last ten years. 

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9 hours ago, Wyobraska said:

I don't think it would have been the savior you thought it would be.  

And all that oil is getting shipped by train between existing pipelines.  Now the ban on oil leases on federal land had an impact. But mostly on the natural gas market not at the pump.

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24 minutes ago, happycamper said:

Convert. Everybody knows that rising gas prices marginally increase other costs. We just also know that the inflation risk for gas prices rising and staying even higher than they are no is essentially zero,  because,  uh, we already did that. 

Talk about new car costs.  Talk about food costs.  Talk about wages. Talk about housing. Talk about medical costs.  But... gas? Good lord con. We've been at this price for four of the last ten years. 

Now if we see $7-10 per gallon at the pump he'd have a point.

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21 minutes ago, HR_Poke said:

Now if we see $7-10 per gallon at the pump he'd have a point.

Exactly.  But that would take some situational awareness to parse out. 

Man Convert makes such lazy poorly thought out arguments he's only like the top 3rd percentile on Twitter smdh

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20 hours ago, happycamper said:

Convert. I worked in and then with the energy sector for about 10 years. If there was any President who could even possibly be "directly responsible" for changing the cost of gas, they would be the most powerful President since FDR. 

Furthermore, the idea that gas prices are a factor in inflation is hilarious. We paid far higher gas prices in 2008 and for pretty much all of 2011-2015, and we paid roughly equivalent gas prices for 2018-2019. We didn't see inflation be pushed much, if at all, then. Hence your thesis that gas prices would be a noticeable factor is disproven by recent history. 

 

It can’t be judged on just a single factor. Gas prices were inflationary in 2008, but in a recession , and the malaise that lasted most of Obama’s presidency the economy actually faced deflationary pressures. That is why thr fed starting aggressive bond buying after they dropped the rate to zero. They were purposely trying to cause inflation. 

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40 minutes ago, bornontheblue said:

It can’t be judged on just a single factor. Gas prices were inflationary in 2008, but in a recession , and the malaise that lasted most of Obama’s presidency the economy actually faced deflationary pressures. That is why thr fed starting aggressive bond buying after they dropped the rate to zero. They were purposely trying to cause inflation. 

Much of that is true. I would firmly disagree with the "malaise of the Obama's presidency" though. 2011-2015 was a period of sustained real GDP growth.  The piddly gas price increase we are seeing today just isn't much of an inflationary pressure. Like HR said, you need to see a 200-400% increase, not a 8% increase over 2 years ago. 

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6 hours ago, happycamper said:

Exactly.  But that would take some situational awareness to parse out. 

Man Convert makes such lazy poorly thought out arguments he's only like the top 3rd percentile on Twitter smdh

 

2 hours ago, happycamper said:

Much of that is true. I would firmly disagree with the "malaise of the Obama's presidency" though. 2011-2015 was a period of sustained real GDP growth.  The piddly gas price increase we are seeing today just isn't much of an inflationary pressure. Like HR said, you need to see a 200-400% increase, not a 8% increase over 2 years ago. 

You social lefty warriors are in such denial when it comes to economics. Anytime you add cost to a company with no increased revenue from the increased cost, it has an inflationary influence on overall inflation. Since there are other factors in what causes overall inflation, deflationary elements can cancel out some of the other inflationary elements such as increased fuel costs for business owners.

So if you want to talk about overall inflation numbers from past years, you have to look at the portfolio of elements that determined why it settled at a certain number. You’re comparing gas prices to an overall inflation number without recognizing the deflationary elements that cancel out inflationary. 

My point is that increased fuel costs on business owners with no increased revenue from the increased cost ALWAYS has an inflationary affect on overall inflation. The increased costs don’t just disappear into pixie dust. To stay in business, they’re passed on to the consumer in goods and services. If overall inflation in a year was 3%, without the increased inflation of increased fuel costs, the overall inflation number would’ve been less than 3%. 

Where I lived in Kansas, in the last two years of Trump, gas ranged from a low of $1.19 to about $2.10 of a high. In the last 6 months it’s been at around $3.00. That’s not an 8% increase, that’s more like 40 to 50%. That’s significant for these people. It will vary obviously in other areas. 

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1 hour ago, Nevada Convert said:

 

You social lefty warriors are in such denial when it comes to economics. Anytime you add cost to a company with no increased revenue from the increased cost, it has an inflationary influence on overall inflation. Since there are other factors in what causes overall inflation, deflationary elements can cancel out some of the other inflationary elements such as increased fuel costs for business owners.

So if you want to talk about overall inflation numbers from past years, you have to look at the portfolio of elements that determined why it settled at a certain number. You’re comparing gas prices to an overall inflation number without recognizing the deflationary elements that cancel out inflationary. 

My point is that increased fuel costs on business owners with no increased revenue from the increased cost ALWAYS has an inflationary affect on overall inflation. The increased costs don’t just disappear into pixie dust. To stay in business, they’re passed on to the consumer in goods and services. If overall inflation in a year was 3%, without the increased inflation of increased fuel costs, the overall inflation number would’ve been less than 3%. 

Where I lived in Kansas, in the last two years of Trump, gas ranged from a low of $1.19 to about $2.10 of a high. In the last 6 months it’s been at around $3.00. That’s not an 8% increase, that’s more like 40 to 50%. That’s significant for these people. It will vary obviously in other areas. 

Convert you realize that you can just, like, look at the average gas price, right? It's 8%. 

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On 10/16/2021 at 4:44 PM, happycamper said:

Convert you realize that you can just, like, look at the average gas price, right? It's 8%. 

You’ve been smoking waaaaay too much weed. Where do you come up with this shit? 

The national average for unleaded gas is $3.27 right now. That’s $1.09 more than it was last year at this time. A barrel of oil was $16 and now it’s $80. Is this some sort of new happy math? 8%???? 🤪🤪😂🤪🤪😝👍
 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/fortune.com/2021/10/11/gas-prices-triple-crude-oil-above-80-supply-shortage-4-dollars-per-gallon/amp/

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3 minutes ago, Nevada Convert said:

You’ve been smoking waaaaay too much weed. Where do you come up with this shit? 
 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/fortune.com/2021/10/11/gas-prices-triple-crude-oil-above-80-supply-shortage-4-dollars-per-gallon/amp/

https://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=pet&s=emm_epm0_pte_nus_dpg&f=m

3.272 vs 2.915

(3.272-2.915)/3.272 = 11%

so I guess ya got me. it's 11%, I eyeballed it last time. 

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