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Conference Realignment thread

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On 9/24/2023 at 3:42 PM, SAMO said:

Totally agree…Was just in LA…stayed on Sunset in WeHo at the Andaz/Riot Hyatt…and felt about like D-FENS from “falling down” after 3 days driving between there and DTLA…lol

NYC at least has a functional subway…lol 

I absolutely love LA…but holy shit the traffic is bad…lol

Thats nothing...I live on the Sunset Strip...you just take Fountain and not Sunset to go EAST/WEST and Cresent Hts for N/S vs La Cienega.  Time of day doesn't matter in Weho..it's the same until 1am-5am everyday.

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On 9/24/2023 at 3:49 PM, smithy said:

Thats nothing...I live on the Sunset Strip...you just take Fountain and not Sunset to go EAST/WEST and Cresent Hts for N/S vs La Cienega.  Time of day doesn't matter in Weho..it's the same until 1am-5am everyday.

Damn. I did end up on fountain a couple times. Def more convenient. Spent a good deal of time being a barstool at Barney’s beanery…lol

thats awesome you live there…would love to relocate from nyc to WeHo in the next couple years…

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Since a lot of folks here are making uninformed or partially-informed comments about UH's stadium situation, let's dive into all the gory details.

For those of you who don't want to read a very long post, the bottom line is in boldface below.

So let's begin with the basics, which most of you already know.  Until the Covid pandemic came along, UH played home games at 50K seat Aloha Stadium, which opened in 1975 at a site about nine miles from campus.  The location next to Pearl Harbor was considered ideal because all of the major highways on Oahu intersect there.  The stadium was built and owned and operated by the state government, and served as a venue for many events in addition to UH football (including massively attended outdoor concerts by the Rolling Stones, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, The Police, The Eagles, U2, Bruno Mars, etc.).  Unfortunately Aloha Stadium's steel structure was not well-maintained by the state and had severe rusting issues, which finally led to the venue being condemned during the pandemic.  Even worse, the state had no agreed-upon plan in place to replace the stadium, leaving UH with no home for football games.

In response to the crisis UH scrambled to convert Ching Field, its on-campus track and field venue and football practice field, into a temporary home football stadium.  Ching originally seated 3K but was rapidly expanded to 9K for football home games last season.  It now seats 15K, with further expansion to 17K planned for next season.  The intent is for this undersized facility to only serve as UH's football home until the state completes a 30K-35K seat Aloha Stadium replacement.  However completion of that project is at least five years away.

The obvious question this raises is, why is UH willing to wait so long?  Doesn't the administration understand that this is terrible for the football program?  Why doesn't UH just build a real on-campus stadium rather than waiting for the state to solve the problem?  The answer is complicated, but it basically comes down to money and politics.

Building a new stadium with modern amenities is expensive, and $400 million in public funding to build a new Aloha Stadium has already been appropriated by the state legislature and approved by the governor.  Since UH can't possibly afford to make that kind of investment on its own, the university is pretty much at the mercy of whatever timeline the state establishes to complete the new Aloha Stadium project.

This is where politics comes in.  If the state were only interested in building a new stadium, construction would already be underway.  But the old Aloha Stadium site includes a great big parking lot, and that represents a huge opportunity for profitable mixed-use development around the new stadium.  In Hawaii such large development projects are strictly controlled by politicians as a means of attracting campaign contributions from the companies competing for the development rights.  This isn't technically illegal because the politicians don't directly pick winners or losers; they just set up the competition in a way that will attract as many architectural, design, construction, and consulting companies as possible, keep them in the competition for as long as possible, and enable as many of them as possible to secure a piece of the action, with the knowledge this will encourage most of the companies to funnel money into their campaign coffers.

This kind of wheeling and dealing was barred in the past with respect to upgrading or replacing the old Aloha Stadium, because it was built on former federal property that was conveyed to the state with the proviso that the land could only be used for recreation.  However, in 2017 the state managed to get that restriction lifted, in part by convincing the federal government that the stadium site was ideal for transit-oriented development that would increase ridership on Honolulu's new federally-subsidized rail transit system, and in part by agreeing to transfer the recreation restriction to some state-owned land on Maui.   At that point the effort to replace Aloha Stadium was transformed by legislators into an effort to implement a massive mixed-use development project (labeled an "entertainment district"), with a new stadium as its centerpiece, that would not only benefit the public but also generate big profits for developers and big campaign money for politicians.

At the time Aloha Stadium was condemned, wheels were already turning to issue RFPs for the new stadium and surrounding entertainment district, but this became controversial when the pandemic caused Hawaii tourism to plunge, state tax revenues to dry up, and the former governor to get cold feet about the whole thing.  He tried to cancel the mixed use development and fast-track the use of the appropriated $400 million to just build a new stadium.  Unsurprisingly the legislature objected and everything deadlocked.  This put the whole project into limbo until the pandemic ended, a new governor was elected, and a new consensus was reached earlier this year to proceed with both a replacement stadium and entertainment district.  In the meantime UH had acted to protect the football program by temporarily upgrading Ching Field.

This is why the timeline for Aloha Stadium replacement now extends out to 2028.  The state is still in the process of writing a complex RFP to select a development team that would (1) demolish the existing condemned stadium and build the new stadium with the $400 million in available public funding, (2) design and coordinate build-out of the surrounding privately-funded mixed-use entertainment district, and (3) use some of the profits from the entertainment district to operate and maintain the stadium for 30 years.  Because writing the RFP, selecting the development team, and executing the public-private development contract is expected to take until mid-2025, the target date to begin actual demolition and construction work is late 2025 and completion of the new stadium is expected in mid-2028.

Here's a recent concept video showing the scope of the entire stadium plus mixed use development project, which could take 20 years to fully build out:

 

Obviously this whole situation has placed the UH administration, and in particular new athletic director Craig Angelos (who was hired in part because he oversaw the fundraising for and construction of Florida Atlantic's new football stadium back in 2009-2011), between a rock and a hard place.

Angelos knows fans aren't thrilled with the temporary Ching Field stadium, which is cozy and student-friendly, but lacks the amenities that long-time fans and boosters took for granted at the old Aloha Stadium (e.g. adequate parking, ample space for tailgating, chairback seating, many concession options, roomy concourses with dedicated eating areas, real restrooms instead of porta-potties, etc.).  He also knows that the timeline for replacing Aloha Stadium may push out even beyond 2028 if the project experiences the construction delays typical of Hawaii public works projects.  And most importantly, he knows that UH's lack of a suitable modern venue for football is not only hampering recruiting, but also undermining Hawaii's case to be included in whatever the Pac-2 + MWC evolve into.  Given these concerns, Angelos has been asked repeatedly by fans and the press whether he would support redirecting the $400 million for the Aloha Stadium replacement project to UH for the purpose of just building a new FBS-caliber stadium on campus.

Angelos has been very careful in answering this question.  He pays lip service to the replacement project, saying the new Aloha Stadium will be a great venue for UH football if the project stays on schedule and is completed as planned.  However he also makes clear that in the meantime he is committed to making Ching Field a bigger, better, more fan-friendly home for the UH football team, and that the university will do its best to secure as much public and private support as possible to advance this goal.  Reading between the lines, I'm sure he would love to see the $400 million redirected to UH, which would move expeditiously to build a great on-campus stadium.  But he also understands that state politicians are very unlikely to support this unless and until it becomes evident that the current Aloha Stadium replacement project is drowning in its own complexity and consequently casting negative publicity on the legislature and governor.

So here's the bottom line:

In a couple of years, either (1) the Aloha Stadium replacement RFP will have been issued, construction will be underway, and everyone will have tangible evidence that UH is on track to having a great new football home on par with Snapdragon Stadium and Canvas Stadium, or (2) the Aloha Stadium replacement project will be so mired in delays and red tape that UH will fully commit to building an FBS-caliber stadium on campus, financed by the $400 million originally slated for replacing Aloha Stadium and/or whatever money UH can drum up from other sources.  Either way there will be clarity about how UH will navigate out of the mess it currently finds itself in.

Hopefully Gloria Nevarez, the other schools in the MWC, and whoever else has a vote will be willing to give UH the benefit of the doubt in the meantime and not cast our football program out into the wilderness where it will almost certainly die.

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On 9/24/2023 at 3:49 PM, smithy said:

Thats nothing...I live on the Sunset Strip...you just take Fountain and not Sunset to go EAST/WEST and Cresent Hts for N/S vs La Cienega.  Time of day doesn't matter in Weho..it's the same until 1am-5am everyday.

And then if you're headed north to the Valley from Sunset Strip, rather than taking Crescent Heights during rush hours (plural), you take Nichols Canyon till it ends at Mulholland then make a quick left and right onto Laurel Canyon. But you better know your way around Nichols because it's easy to get lost because it winds around and road signs are minimal. Locals like it that way, of course, and although I've heard there's an app for Nichols, I've never actually seen one.

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On 9/24/2023 at 4:52 PM, HawaiiMongoose said:

Since a lot of folks here are making uninformed or partially-informed comments about UH's stadium situation, let's dive into all the gory details.

For those of you who don't want to read a very long post, the bottom line is in boldface below.

So let's begin with the basics, which most of you already know.  Until the Covid pandemic came along, UH played home games at 50K seat Aloha Stadium, which opened in 1975 at a site about nine miles from campus.  The location next to Pearl Harbor was considered ideal because all of the major highways on Oahu intersect there.  The stadium was built and owned and operated by the state government, and served as a venue for many events in addition to UH football (including massively attended outdoor concerts by the Rolling Stones, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, The Police, The Eagles, U2, Bruno Mars, etc.).  Unfortunately Aloha Stadium's steel structure was not well-maintained by the state and had severe rusting issues, which finally led to the venue being condemned during the pandemic.  Even worse, the state had no agreed-upon plan in place to replace the stadium, leaving UH with no home for football games.

In response to the crisis UH scrambled to convert Ching Field, its on-campus track and field venue and football practice field, into a temporary home football stadium.  Ching originally seated 3K but was rapidly expanded to 9K for football home games last season.  It now seats 15K, with further expansion to 17K planned for next season.  The intent is for this undersized facility to only serve as UH's football home until the state completes a 30K-35K seat Aloha Stadium replacement.  However completion of that project is at least five years away.

The obvious question this raises is, why is UH willing to wait so long?  Doesn't the administration understand that this is terrible for the football program?  Why doesn't UH just build a real on-campus stadium rather than waiting for the state to solve the problem?  The answer is complicated, but it basically comes down to money and politics.

Building a new stadium with modern amenities is expensive, and $400 million in public funding to build a new Aloha Stadium has already been appropriated by the state legislature and approved by the governor.  Since UH can't possibly afford to make that kind of investment on its own, the university is pretty much at the mercy of whatever timeline the state establishes to complete the new Aloha Stadium project.

This is where politics comes in.  If the state were only interested in building a new stadium, construction would already be underway.  But the old Aloha Stadium is surrounded by a great big parking lot, and that represents a huge opportunity for profitable mixed-use development around the new stadium.  In Hawaii such large development projects are strictly controlled by politicians as a means of attracting campaign contributions from the companies competing for the development rights.  This isn't technically illegal because the politicians don't directly pick winners or losers; they just set up the competition in a way that will attract as many architectural, design, construction, and consulting companies as possible, keep them in the competition for as long as possible, and enable as many of them as possible to secure a piece of the action, with the knowledge this will encourage most of the companies to funnel money into their campaign coffers.

This kind of wheeling and dealing was barred in the past with respect to upgrading or replacing the old Aloha Stadium, because it (and its parking lot) was built on former federal property that was conveyed to the state with the proviso that the land could only be used for recreation.  However, in 2017 the state managed to get that restriction lifted, in part by convincing the federal government that the stadium site was ideal for transit-oriented development that would increase ridership on Honolulu's new federally-subsidized rail transit system, and in part by agreeing to transfer the recreation restriction to some state-owned land on Maui.   At that point the effort to replace Aloha Stadium was transformed by legislators into an effort to implement a massive mixed-use development project (labeled an "entertainment district"), with a new stadium as its centerpiece, that would not only benefit the public but also generate big profits for developers and big campaign money for politicians.

At the time Aloha Stadium was condemned, wheels were already turning to issue RFPs for the new stadium and surrounding entertainment district, but this became controversial when the pandemic caused Hawaii tourism to plunge, state tax revenues to dry up, and the former governor to get cold feet about the whole thing.  He tried to cancel the mixed use development and fast-track the use of the appropriated $400 million to just build a new stadium.  Unsurprisingly the legislature objected and everything deadlocked.  This put the whole project into limbo until the pandemic ended, a new governor was elected, and a new consensus was reached earlier this year to proceed with both a replacement stadium and entertainment district.  In the meantime UH had acted to protect the football program by temporarily upgrading Ching Field.

This is why the timeline for Aloha Stadium replacement now extends out to 2028.  The state is still in the process of writing a complex RFP to select a development team that would (1) demolish the existing condemned stadium and build the new stadium with the $400 million in available public funding, (2) design and coordinate build-out of the surrounding privately-funded mixed-use entertainment district, and (3) use some of the profits from the entertainment district to operate and maintain the stadium for 30 years.  Because writing the RFP, selecting the development team, and executing the public-private development contract is expected to take until mid-2025, the target date to begin actual demolition and construction work is late 2025 and completion of the new stadium is expected in mid-2028.

Here's a recent concept video showing the scope of the entire stadium plus mixed use development project, which could take 20 years to fully build out:

 

Obviously this whole situation has placed the UH administration, and in particular new athletic director Craig Angelos (who was hired in part because he oversaw the fundraising for and construction of Florida Atlantic's new football stadium back in 2009-2011), between a rock and a hard place.

Angelos knows fans aren't thrilled with the temporary Ching Field stadium, which is cozy and student-friendly, but lacks the amenities that long-time fans and boosters took for granted at the old Aloha Stadium (e.g. adequate parking, ample space for tailgating, chairback seating, many concession options, roomy concourses with dedicated eating areas, real restrooms instead of porta-potties, etc.).  He also knows that the timeline for replacing Aloha Stadium may push out even beyond 2028 if the project experiences the construction delays typical of Hawaii public works projects.  And most importantly, he knows that UH's lack of a suitable modern venue for football is not only hampering recruiting, but also undermining Hawaii's case to be included in whatever the Pac-2 + MWC evolve into.  Given these concerns, Angelos has been asked repeatedly by fans and the press whether he would support redirecting the $400 million for the Aloha Stadium replacement project to UH for the purpose of just building a new FBS-caliber stadium on campus.

Angelos has been very careful in answering this question.  He pays lip service to the replacement project, saying the new Aloha Stadium will be a great venue for UH football if the project stays on schedule and is completed as planned.  However he also makes clear that in the meantime he is committed to making Ching Field a bigger, better, more fan-friendly home for the UH football team, and that the university will do its best to secure as much public and private support as possible to advance this goal.  Reading between the lines, I'm sure he would love to see the $400 million redirected to UH, which would move expeditiously to build a great on-campus stadium.  But he also understands that state politicians are very unlikely to support this unless and until it becomes evident that the current Aloha Stadium replacement project is drowning in its own complexity and consequently casting negative publicity on the legislature and governor.

So here's the bottom line:

In a couple of years, either (1) the Aloha Stadium replacement RFP will have been issued, construction will be underway, and everyone will have tangible evidence that UH is on track to having a great new football home on par with Snapdragon Stadium and Canvas Stadium, or (2) the Aloha Stadium replacement project will be so mired in delays and red tape that UH will fully commit to building an FBS-caliber stadium on campus, financed by the $400 million originally slated for replacing Aloha Stadium or by whatever money UH can drum up from other sources.  Either way there will be clarity about how UH will navigate out of the mess it currently finds itself in.

Hopefully Gloria Nevarez, the other schools in the MWC, and whoever else has a vote will be willing to give UH the benefit of the doubt in the meantime and not cast our football program out into the wilderness where it will almost certainly die.

Long read, but lot’s of info there.

And, that is a super nice development project. I hope it happens to you guys. Looks amazing. 

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Also on the topic of Aloha Stadium and Ching Field, below are some gameday pics of UH's recent home opener against Stanford, courtesy of the Stadium Journey website ( https://www.stadiumjourney.com/stadiums/clarence-t-c-ching-athletics-complex-hawaii-rainbow-warriors ).  I think these show that the potential exists to upgrade Ching into a pretty nice home football venue if some or all of the $400 million currently allocated for a new Aloha Stadium were redirected to the university to build an FBS-caliber stadium there instead.

669cfa_c5957296e91e484fac5ac4ea2ff3afa0~

669cfa_525fd40dbd794e4d8e6e814e8a9e451e~

669cfa_485e8aa1affc4fb1bfe4c54a997c7d80~

669cfa_268336a3fa8f4326bdc1889e88c3bc30~

669cfa_3c4562bcce83464b85cad8e91d542c89~

669cfa_e64b6f40f4b448dfb95f058e019d1ca4~

669cfa_f333d4f8548c4e50a3d3e33078754d67~

669cfa_d9b13bcfacf44d3fad45f69668813b1f~

669cfa_0ab03336a41141f7b951f94dbb209e78~

669cfa_40fe8330ff154971b2a5114be4df7049~

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On 9/24/2023 at 3:52 PM, HawaiiMongoose said:

Since a lot of folks here are making uninformed or partially-informed comments about UH's stadium situation, let's dive into all the gory details.

For those of you who don't want to read a very long post, the bottom line is in boldface below.

So let's begin with the basics, which most of you already know.  Until the Covid pandemic came along, UH played home games at 50K seat Aloha Stadium, which opened in 1975 at a site about nine miles from campus.  The location next to Pearl Harbor was considered ideal because all of the major highways on Oahu intersect there.  The stadium was built and owned and operated by the state government, and served as a venue for many events in addition to UH football (including massively attended outdoor concerts by the Rolling Stones, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, The Police, The Eagles, U2, Bruno Mars, etc.).  Unfortunately Aloha Stadium's steel structure was not well-maintained by the state and had severe rusting issues, which finally led to the venue being condemned during the pandemic.  Even worse, the state had no agreed-upon plan in place to replace the stadium, leaving UH with no home for football games.

In response to the crisis UH scrambled to convert Ching Field, its on-campus track and field venue and football practice field, into a temporary home football stadium.  Ching originally seated 3K but was rapidly expanded to 9K for football home games last season.  It now seats 15K, with further expansion to 17K planned for next season.  The intent is for this undersized facility to only serve as UH's football home until the state completes a 30K-35K seat Aloha Stadium replacement.  However completion of that project is at least five years away.

The obvious question this raises is, why is UH willing to wait so long?  Doesn't the administration understand that this is terrible for the football program?  Why doesn't UH just build a real on-campus stadium rather than waiting for the state to solve the problem?  The answer is complicated, but it basically comes down to money and politics.

Building a new stadium with modern amenities is expensive, and $400 million in public funding to build a new Aloha Stadium has already been appropriated by the state legislature and approved by the governor.  Since UH can't possibly afford to make that kind of investment on its own, the university is pretty much at the mercy of whatever timeline the state establishes to complete the new Aloha Stadium project.

This is where politics comes in.  If the state were only interested in building a new stadium, construction would already be underway.  But the old Aloha Stadium is surrounded by a great big parking lot, and that represents a huge opportunity for profitable mixed-use development around the new stadium.  In Hawaii such large development projects are strictly controlled by politicians as a means of attracting campaign contributions from the companies competing for the development rights.  This isn't technically illegal because the politicians don't directly pick winners or losers; they just set up the competition in a way that will attract as many architectural, design, construction, and consulting companies as possible, keep them in the competition for as long as possible, and enable as many of them as possible to secure a piece of the action, with the knowledge this will encourage most of the companies to funnel money into their campaign coffers.

This kind of wheeling and dealing was barred in the past with respect to upgrading or replacing the old Aloha Stadium, because it (and its parking lot) was built on former federal property that was conveyed to the state with the proviso that the land could only be used for recreation.  However, in 2017 the state managed to get that restriction lifted, in part by convincing the federal government that the stadium site was ideal for transit-oriented development that would increase ridership on Honolulu's new federally-subsidized rail transit system, and in part by agreeing to transfer the recreation restriction to some state-owned land on Maui.   At that point the effort to replace Aloha Stadium was transformed by legislators into an effort to implement a massive mixed-use development project (labeled an "entertainment district"), with a new stadium as its centerpiece, that would not only benefit the public but also generate big profits for developers and big campaign money for politicians.

At the time Aloha Stadium was condemned, wheels were already turning to issue RFPs for the new stadium and surrounding entertainment district, but this became controversial when the pandemic caused Hawaii tourism to plunge, state tax revenues to dry up, and the former governor to get cold feet about the whole thing.  He tried to cancel the mixed use development and fast-track the use of the appropriated $400 million to just build a new stadium.  Unsurprisingly the legislature objected and everything deadlocked.  This put the whole project into limbo until the pandemic ended, a new governor was elected, and a new consensus was reached earlier this year to proceed with both a replacement stadium and entertainment district.  In the meantime UH had acted to protect the football program by temporarily upgrading Ching Field.

This is why the timeline for Aloha Stadium replacement now extends out to 2028.  The state is still in the process of writing a complex RFP to select a development team that would (1) demolish the existing condemned stadium and build the new stadium with the $400 million in available public funding, (2) design and coordinate build-out of the surrounding privately-funded mixed-use entertainment district, and (3) use some of the profits from the entertainment district to operate and maintain the stadium for 30 years.  Because writing the RFP, selecting the development team, and executing the public-private development contract is expected to take until mid-2025, the target date to begin actual demolition and construction work is late 2025 and completion of the new stadium is expected in mid-2028.

Here's a recent concept video showing the scope of the entire stadium plus mixed use development project, which could take 20 years to fully build out:

 

Obviously this whole situation has placed the UH administration, and in particular new athletic director Craig Angelos (who was hired in part because he oversaw the fundraising for and construction of Florida Atlantic's new football stadium back in 2009-2011), between a rock and a hard place.

Angelos knows fans aren't thrilled with the temporary Ching Field stadium, which is cozy and student-friendly, but lacks the amenities that long-time fans and boosters took for granted at the old Aloha Stadium (e.g. adequate parking, ample space for tailgating, chairback seating, many concession options, roomy concourses with dedicated eating areas, real restrooms instead of porta-potties, etc.).  He also knows that the timeline for replacing Aloha Stadium may push out even beyond 2028 if the project experiences the construction delays typical of Hawaii public works projects.  And most importantly, he knows that UH's lack of a suitable modern venue for football is not only hampering recruiting, but also undermining Hawaii's case to be included in whatever the Pac-2 + MWC evolve into.  Given these concerns, Angelos has been asked repeatedly by fans and the press whether he would support redirecting the $400 million for the Aloha Stadium replacement project to UH for the purpose of just building a new FBS-caliber stadium on campus.

Angelos has been very careful in answering this question.  He pays lip service to the replacement project, saying the new Aloha Stadium will be a great venue for UH football if the project stays on schedule and is completed as planned.  However he also makes clear that in the meantime he is committed to making Ching Field a bigger, better, more fan-friendly home for the UH football team, and that the university will do its best to secure as much public and private support as possible to advance this goal.  Reading between the lines, I'm sure he would love to see the $400 million redirected to UH, which would move expeditiously to build a great on-campus stadium.  But he also understands that state politicians are very unlikely to support this unless and until it becomes evident that the current Aloha Stadium replacement project is drowning in its own complexity and consequently casting negative publicity on the legislature and governor.

So here's the bottom line:

In a couple of years, either (1) the Aloha Stadium replacement RFP will have been issued, construction will be underway, and everyone will have tangible evidence that UH is on track to having a great new football home on par with Snapdragon Stadium and Canvas Stadium, or (2) the Aloha Stadium replacement project will be so mired in delays and red tape that UH will fully commit to building an FBS-caliber stadium on campus, financed by the $400 million originally slated for replacing Aloha Stadium or by whatever money UH can drum up from other sources.  Either way there will be clarity about how UH will navigate out of the mess it currently finds itself in.

Hopefully Gloria Nevarez, the other schools in the MWC, and whoever else has a vote will be willing to give UH the benefit of the doubt in the meantime and not cast our football program out into the wilderness where it will almost certainly die.

Regarding the rendering: Do Hawaiian’s really dig watching FB from the endzone? The lack of upper deck along the length of the field is bizarre. 

kat.jpg

 

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On 9/24/2023 at 4:17 PM, HawaiiMongoose said:

Also on the topic of Aloha Stadium and Ching Field, below are some gameday pics of UH's recent home opener against Stanford, courtesy of the Stadium Journey website ( https://www.stadiumjourney.com/stadiums/clarence-t-c-ching-athletics-complex-hawaii-rainbow-warriors ).  I think these show that the potential exists to upgrade Ching into a pretty nice home football venue if some or all of the $400 million currently allocated for a new Aloha Stadium were redirected to the university to build an FBS-caliber stadium there instead.

669cfa_c5957296e91e484fac5ac4ea2ff3afa0~

669cfa_525fd40dbd794e4d8e6e814e8a9e451e~

669cfa_485e8aa1affc4fb1bfe4c54a997c7d80~

669cfa_268336a3fa8f4326bdc1889e88c3bc30~

669cfa_3c4562bcce83464b85cad8e91d542c89~

669cfa_e64b6f40f4b448dfb95f058e019d1ca4~

669cfa_f333d4f8548c4e50a3d3e33078754d67~

669cfa_d9b13bcfacf44d3fad45f69668813b1f~

669cfa_0ab03336a41141f7b951f94dbb209e78~

669cfa_40fe8330ff154971b2a5114be4df7049~

 

So that's what the place looks like on gameday.  Very nice.

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On 9/24/2023 at 1:34 PM, Nevada Convert said:

Regarding the rendering: Do Hawaiian’s really dig watching FB from the endzone? The lack of upper deck along the length of the field is bizarre. 

Fans of the UH football program have made the same comment in stadium planning sessions.  The conceptual design consultant says that a C-shaped design (with upper decks in both endzones but only along one sideline) is best for concerts, since the stage would be situated on the sideline without the upper deck.  Football fans think that design is ludicrous because sideline seating generates far more revenue than end zone seating for football.  But the politicians are leaning toward blessing the C-shaped design because they want to emphasize the message that the stadium won’t only be for sports but also for other events.

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On 9/24/2023 at 4:48 PM, HawaiiMongoose said:

Fans of the UH football program have made the same comment in stadium planning sessions.  The conceptual design consultant says that a C-shaped design (with upper decks in both endzones but only along one sideline) is best for concerts, since the stage would be situated on the sideline without the upper deck.  Football fans think that design is ludicrous because sideline seating generates far more revenue than end zone seating for football.  But the politicians are leaning toward blessing the C-shaped design because they want to emphasize the message that the stadium won’t only be for sports but also for other events.

Keep the C-shape, and also add the deck.

These people are complete morons. Where on this planet does a stadium get designed to put the stage at the 50 yard line and use endzone seating as sides with upper decks that are way far away off to the sides? No one’s going to buy side view seats that far away, especially upper deck. These people are so stupid it should be a crime. 

If you’re going to put the stage at the 50 yard line, just do an in-the-round stage and invest in the opposite sideline with an upper deck and cut the end zones. 

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kat.jpg

 

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On 9/24/2023 at 3:04 PM, CPslograd said:

Sure, hop on a plane at FAT, get a fruity cocktail then take a nap, presto, you land and some cute girl puts a leia around your neck.  A shuttle takes you ten minutes to the hotel for the night.  Get up in the morning and go to the AZ memorial, then go to practice.  Play a game the next day.

Not that hard.

How do you know it will be a cute girl though? Thinking about that for 6 hours is difficult but being on a Southwest flight for that long is killer as well. Those coming from the East wow that would be quite a flight.

However, back in the 70s and 80s, watched interviews with coaches from like Nebraska, Oklahoma, Notre Dame and some other schools they talked about the end of season game in Hawaii was almost like a vacation or a reward for the team.

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On 9/24/2023 at 4:48 PM, HawaiiMongoose said:

Fans of the UH football program have made the same comment in stadium planning sessions.  The conceptual design consultant says that a C-shaped design (with upper decks in both endzones but only along one sideline) is best for concerts, since the stage would be situated on the sideline without the upper deck.  Football fans think that design is ludicrous because sideline seating generates far more revenue than end zone seating for football.  But the politicians are leaning toward blessing the C-shaped design because they want to emphasize the message that the stadium won’t only be for sports but also for other events.

I scribbled a sketch. They should just design an all upper deck horseshoe shape. The lower attended concerts they can move the stage towards the bottom of the “U” for more of an amphitheater style, and move it towards the top for larger capacity. 

IMG_2694.jpeg.e536b354aef3b41aa748f4d2fbd8b9ad.jpeg

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kat.jpg

 

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On 9/24/2023 at 2:49 PM, Nevada Convert said:

I scribbled a sketch. They should just design an all upper deck horseshoe shape. The lower attended concerts they can move the stage towards the bottom of the “U” for more of an amphitheater style, and move it towards the top for larger capacity. 

IMG_2694.jpeg.e536b354aef3b41aa748f4d2fbd8b9ad.jpeg

Makes total sense.

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On 9/24/2023 at 11:29 AM, CPslograd said:

I have noticed a trend of Wyoming fans not valuing Hawaii as a MWC member.  It is a little funny when they mention the travel issues.  Honolulu from Nevada or California is not a tough flight.  I think it's easier travel there than to Logan or Laramie.

Hawaii has good football tradition and a long history with the PST teams of the conference.  

I agree that they do need to get serious about their stadium situation.

I'm generally indifferent to Hawaii ... but I'm guessing Hawaii fans feel the same about Wyoming. 

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On 9/24/2023 at 3:50 PM, EvilPoke said:

I'm generally indifferent to Hawaii ... but I'm guessing Hawaii fans feel the same about Wyoming. 

I think most Hawaii fans are aware of the Paniolo Trophy rivalry and consequently are happy to have Wyoming in the conference.  Of course going from sea level to Laramie’s altitude to play a game is quite a challenge for the Warriors.

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On 9/24/2023 at 6:50 PM, EvilPoke said:

I'm generally indifferent to Hawaii ... but I'm guessing Hawaii fans feel the same about Wyoming. 

 

On 9/24/2023 at 8:07 PM, HawaiiMongoose said:

I think most Hawaii fans are aware of the Paniolo Trophy rivalry and consequently are happy to have Wyoming in the conference.  Of course going from sea level to Laramie’s altitude to play a game is quite a challenge for the Warriors.

UH needs to build a practice field upcountry on Maui.

Now that I think about it, the Dogs should practice at the one at Hune Lake before playing  at the SEC Mountain teams

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