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The current version of the GOP is stupidest version to exist

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15 minutes ago, CPslograd said:

Yes but also dated....

August 23, 2017 8.34pm EDT
 

I think it was completely true the anti-Vaccination movement was non-political prior to Covid.  But in the political swirl of trying to minimize Covid, I think it has changed significantly.   

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Just now, sactowndog said:

Yes but also dated....

August 23, 2017 8.34pm EDT
 

I think it was completely true the anti-Vaccination movement was non-political prior to Covid.  But in the political swirl of trying to minimize Covid, I think it has changed significantly.   

I think it has probably always been political. Just that anti-vaxxers weren't the sole domain of one political ideology or another. I still think it's that way, to some degree, but it does appear that the anti-vaxx sentiment on the right is growing at a rapid pace. 

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1 hour ago, Del Scorcho said:

I work in healthcare and the anti-vaxers hurt us all where it really counts, in the f__king wallet.

It's not uncommon for someone very sick with COVID to spend a month in the ICU. A month in the hospital is typically a seven figure hospital bill. Those cost will inevitably trickle down to your health insurance provider and increase your premiums. Not to mention the financial impact of those who will need to claim medical bankruptcy. Those costs will be spread out to all of us in increased medical costs.

Its as selfish decision from a hundred different vantage points.

 

This is another oddity...........all these "fiscal conservative" republicans not getting the vaccine or advocating FOR not getting the vaccine are just causing massive losses in the healthcare arena...........and they are probably more apt to not even have health insurance 

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16 hours ago, tailingpermit said:

He hadn’t even moved yet, you are fake news.  

Okay, decided he was moving to Tennessee.

And since it's Mr. Grumpy's term, I'm proud to be called fake news.

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40 minutes ago, sactowndog said:

So yes blacks are vaccinated at a lower rate.  Are you claiming it’s a hesitancy problem or a distribution problem?  Those two are very different problems to solve.  

Given you can get the shot at the local grocery store I’d say its blacks being distrustful of what whiteys vaccine might do to them. 

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24 minutes ago, 818SUDSFan said:

Okay, decided he was moving to Tennessee.

And since it's Mr. Grumpy's term, I'm proud to be called fake news.

He just stole it.  Fake news became a term popularized by the left to label social media nonsense and non stories before Trump took it.

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7 minutes ago, soupslam1 said:

Given you can get the shot at the local grocery store I’d say its blacks being distrustful of what whiteys vaccine might do to them. 

So what are white Republicans excuse? Are they distrustful of whitey as well?

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1 hour ago, CPslograd said:

I don't really have a problem with mandatory vaccines for attendance in public school.  Although, I know people who don't vaccinate and their kids seem to go to public schools, so I don't know if it is actually enforced or what.

My issue with the Covid vaccine is that it hasn't undergone full trials, it is not a high risk illness for children, so I think it is unreasonable to mandate it for attendance until it has undergone full trials.

I still haven't decided whether or not to have my boy get it.  I don't think he cares one way or the other.  If they would do away with the stupid masks in class if you get it, he'd want to do it.

I can appreciate that. However, the issue isn't so much the direct impact to the health of young children as it is the other, more vulnerable members of the population they encounter (family members, care providers, etc.).

Another area of concern is allowing the virus a large population of susceptible people (e.g., a school full of school kids) in which to mutate and get in front of the immunity the vaccines provide. We see this in the Delta variant and the reduced efficacy of the vaccines against it.

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16 minutes ago, TheSanDiegan said:

I can appreciate that. However, the issue isn't so much the direct impact to the health of young children as it is the other, more vulnerable members of the population they encounter (family members, care providers, etc.).

Another area of concern is allowing the virus a large population of susceptible people (e.g., a school full of school kids) in which to mutate and get in front of the immunity the vaccines provide. We see this in the Delta variant and the reduced efficacy of the vaccines against it.

The virus is going to mutate anyway.  It's not getting eradicated worldwide.  It will find a resevoir somewhere.

And the most vulnerable members of the population are the most likely to be vaccinated.  If they choose not to get vaccinated, then that's their deal.

 

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1 minute ago, CPslograd said:

The virus is going to mutate anyway.  It's not getting eradicated worldwide.  It will find a resevoir somewhere.

And the most vulnerable members of the population are the most likely to be vaccinated.  If they choose not to get vaccinated, then that's their deal.

 

Horrible logic. The rate of mutation is wholly dependent on the size of the susceptible population, full stop. Because science.

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1 minute ago, TheSanDiegan said:

Horrible logic. The rate of mutation is wholly dependent on the size of the susceptible population, full stop. Because science.

The size of the population of the globe!  Of which 13-16 year old Americans are a ridiculously small percentage.  The idea that vaccinating that small percentage of the global population is going to signifcantly impact the evolutionary course of the virus is silly.

 

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5 minutes ago, TheSanDiegan said:

Horrible logic. The rate of mutation is wholly dependent on the size of the susceptible population, full stop. Because science.

Your logic is horrible.  If the rate of mutation is your primary concern you should want us to be prioritizing vulnerable population in other countries over a low risk group like teens in the USA.

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10 minutes ago, CPslograd said:

Your logic is horrible.  If the rate of mutation is your primary concern you should want us to be prioritizing vulnerable population in other countries over a low risk group like teens in the USA.

This is a very good point. We’ve pledged a lot of vaccine outside our borders, but not nearly enough and not as much as we could. We also should be prioritizing the adult population here who are choosing not to vaccinate for whatever reason. But that is being met with resistance, too.

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1 hour ago, CPslograd said:

The size of the population of the globe!  Of which 13-16 year old Americans are a ridiculously small percentage.  The idea that vaccinating that small percentage of the global population is going to signifcantly impact the evolutionary course of the virus is silly.

 

No. Wrong. Incorrect. :facepalm:You're understanding of epidemiology leaves something everything to be desired.

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1 hour ago, CPslograd said:

If the rate of mutation is your primary concern you should want us to be prioritizing vulnerable population in other countries over a low risk group like teens in the USA.

This is true, as evidenced by the promulgation o fate Delta variant, and the other variants (e.g., UK, Brazil, S. Africa) before it. However, the validity of this statement does not, in any way, impact the validity of my last post to which you replied; the two are not mutually exclusive.

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Look at the UK. If the vaccines don't help prevent the spread of covid why should the invulnerable get them at all? It appears vaccinating large percentages of the population makes no difference in the transmission. Children are at basically zero risk from actually getting sick from covid and would still transmit the virus (what little they are able to). So difference does it make to those that are not vulnerable?

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17 minutes ago, TheSanDiegan said:

This is true, as evidenced by the promulgation o fate Delta variant, and the other variants (e.g., UK, Brazil, S. Africa) before it. However, the validity of this statement does not, in any way, impact the validity of my last post to which you replied; the two are not mutually exclusive.

More evidence is needed on the use of the different COVID-19 vaccines in children to be able to make general recommendations on vaccinating children against COVID-19

This is directly from the WHO's June guidance.

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/covid-19-vaccines/advice

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23 minutes ago, Bob said:

If the vaccines don't help prevent the spread of covid

Bob we have infectious data from the US which proves this statement to be absolutely false

why are you an anti-vaxer propagandist? what do you get out of this?

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3 minutes ago, happycamper said:

Bob we have infectious data from the US which proves this statement to be absolutely false

why are you an anti-vaxer propagandist? what do you get out of this?

Why is the UK experiencing a surge in cases as bad as any they've had when they are the most vaccinated major country on earth?

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43 minutes ago, Bob said:

Why is the UK experiencing a surge in cases as bad as any they've had when they are the most vaccinated major country on earth?

1. They're not the "most vaccinated major country on earth". Chile is. The US and UK are roughly equivalent in terms of vaccination. 

2. We've determined that we need about 70-90% of the population to be fully vaccinated to provide herd immunity (I think in most other viruses we say 85% so let's roll with that). The UK is far from that. 

3. There's about a 3 week lag between reported infections and the actual infection date. They opened... pretty early

This... is just simple d00d

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