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Police Officer Flips Pregnant Woman's Car While Attempting PIT Maneuver

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1 minute ago, halfmanhalfbronco said:

All ranchers are bad, too.  Every single one of em.  I am sure some good people are ranchers, but you can't be a good rancher.

#savethewolves

systemic speciesism 

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Just now, halfmanhalfbronco said:

All ranchers are bad, too.  Every single one of em.  I am sure some good people are ranchers, but you can't be a good rancher.

#savethewolves

All cops are bad.

All republicans in Idaho are bad.

All ranchers are bad.

Is there any group of people you like?

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1 minute ago, smltwnrckr said:

Eh, most of that job is sitting on your ass and eating Chinese takeout. 

 

Which leads me to believe it is the type of people attracted to those jobs, not the jobs themselves.  

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1 minute ago, Aslowhiteguy said:

All cops are bad.

All republicans in Idaho are bad.

All ranchers are bad.

Is there any group of people you like?

 

Astronauts are all right, I guess.

 

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38 minutes ago, halfmanhalfbronco said:

 

Can PO's use lethal force at their own discretion while "peace keeping" with only 27 weeks of training like the Baltimore police can?  

ACAB.  All cops are bastards.

Find me a department that requires 4 years of training before they get their badge and I may consider your point of view.  I will wait.

 

 

Even through the pretty damned limited training that they get, you have to look at the disparity in what they train,

931IwwQ.png

 

They literally spend more time training to shoot their gun than they do on the actual LAW that they're sworn to uphold. I mean, shit, 8 entire hours on Ethics and Integrity. I had to take more credit hours for my Information Technology Bachelors than the average law enforcement office in this country did. Nearly 600% more time spent on learning to defend yourself than on Professionalism. There is a fundamental problem in this country with policing. 

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10 minutes ago, Aslowhiteguy said:

 

She did not do that while active in her duty as an astronaut, so I'll let it slide.  Girls will be girls, after all.

 

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1 minute ago, Bob said:

so woke

Nah, I just don't have an issue understanding reality. You keep on living in your opaque bubble there, little man.

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41 minutes ago, smltwnrckr said:

Police should be held even more accountable than the average citizen for wrongdoing, because the social stakes are so high.

ding ding ding

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50 minutes ago, halfmanhalfbronco said:

Find me a department that requires 4 years of training before they get their badge and I may consider your point of view.  I will wait.

A graduate degree in social work only requires 30-60 credit hours. 

Not really sure I'd trust one more than a cop alone when dealing with a multi-faceted situation that may be endangering multiple people.

 

I'd trust my barber more than any public servant.

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34 minutes ago, smltwnrckr said:

Also, I increasingly reject the more moderate ideas coming out of the "defund" movement that call diverting funds for a lot of the stuff cops do now to social service workers and agencies. I see the logical endpoint to that not being less policing but a sort of slow deputization of social services.  the people who work in those positions and the unions that represent them will increasingly demand more power and authority to use force as they argue they are dealing with increasingly criminal and dangerous elements of society. Instead of people dealing with a kinder, more understanding social worker or counselor in lieu of a cop, they will be dealing with a social worker or counselor who now has a gun, badge and handcuffs. I was around multiple probation departments back in the day that demanded guns and elite response teams. And in my Anytown, USA, I see probation K9 units all the time. It's no longer that jerk who shows up a couple times a week, checks to make sure you're looking for a job and might make you take a piss test. It's a guy who can kick down your door with a gun drawn and sick a dog on you if you run.

hm.  that's one i'll have to noodle on.

why does the momentum favor "deputizing social workers" (in quotes to convey a sense of what's going on, not to be a snarky dick)?

many of the needs of the population could be met by social workers, so i see that as a good thing.

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6 minutes ago, misplacedcowboy said:

A graduate degree in social work only requires 30-60 credit hours. 

Not really sure I'd trust one more than a cop alone when dealing with a multi-faceted situation that may be endangering multiple people.

 

I'd trust my barber more than any public servant.

 

Bus drivers are ok.

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31 minutes ago, AndroidAggie said:

hm.  that's one i'll have to noodle on.

why does the momentum favor "deputizing social workers" (in quotes to convey a sense of what's going on, not to be a snarky dick)?

many of the needs of the population could be met by social workers, so i see that as a good thing.

If you shift the burden but still criminalize activities like drug use and prostitution and things like that, it is going to happen because those people will increasingly be dealing with people who are by definition criminals. If not literally deputizing the social services sector, you will increase the relationship and flow of information between that sector and the law enforcement sector in a way that leads to more law enforcement interventions into the social services sector and will expand the reach of the security and law enforcement apparatus. Why would it happen? Because it's happened other times where reforms related to criminal justice have lead to extending the reach of the security apparatus instead of helping the people who supposedly need it.

Probation was my example earlier because probation is meant to be a kind of alternative to incarceration, and probation officers have for a long time kind of served as half social worker half police officer and have been part of criminal justice reform efforts. But they have increasingly become more police officer and less social worker as they have argued that those reforms have meant they are dealing with more "dangerous criminals."

School Resource Officers were also sold to communities in many ways as a form of community policing, where students would interface with a non-threatening buddy cop who would get to know the kids, tell them to pass on grass and thus offer a more empathic form of justice necessary for youths. But in many cases, it really just resulted in an easier way to bust kids for drugs on campus or to serve as a bouncer in classrooms when a student gets unruly. When I was in 6th grade, I got in a lot of trouble for lightning a fire on my school premises during lunch recess (long story). I was questioned by the school resource police officer without a lawyer or even a teacher present, and without my parents being notified. I wasn't charged with anything, but I didn't really damage anything either. And I was a "good" white kid at a quiet white school... imagine what would have happened if I was one of the "troubled" students of color. 

In prisons, educational reforms were installed in many places after the Attica riots in order to offer some educational and training services to inmates so that they're not just rotting away and can perhaps get a job or have a skill when they left prison. But in large measure, these programs are often used as part of the security and punitive mechanisms in the prison - an additional tool for controlling, watching and punishing inmates, not educating or training them.

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44 minutes ago, smltwnrckr said:

If you shift the burden but still criminalize activities like drug use and prostitution and things like that, it is going to happen because those people will increasingly be dealing with people who are by definition criminals. If not literally deputizing the social services sector, you will increase the relationship and flow of information between that sector and the law enforcement sector in a way that leads to more law enforcement interventions into the social services sector and will expand the reach of the security and law enforcement apparatus. Why would it happen? Because it's happened other times where reforms related to criminal justice have lead to extending the reach of the security apparatus instead of helping the people who supposedly need it.

Probation was my example earlier because probation is meant to be a kind of alternative to incarceration, and probation officers have for a long time kind of served as half social worker half police officer and have been part of criminal justice reform efforts. But they have increasingly become more police officer and less social worker as they have argued that those reforms have meant they are dealing with more "dangerous criminals."

School Resource Officers were also sold to communities in many ways as a form of community policing, where students would interface with a non-threatening buddy cop who would get to know the kids, tell them to pass on grass and thus offer a more empathic form of justice necessary for youths. But in many cases, it really just resulted in an easier way to bust kids for drugs on campus or to serve as a bouncer in classrooms when a student gets unruly. When I was in 6th grade, I got in a lot of trouble for lightning a fire on my school premises during lunch recess (long story). I was questioned by the school resource police officer without a lawyer or even a teacher present, and without my parents being notified. I wasn't charged with anything, but I didn't really damage anything either. And I was a "good" white kid at a quiet white school... imagine what would have happened if I was one of the "troubled" students of color. 

In prisons, educational reforms were installed in many places after the Attica riots in order to offer some educational and training services to inmates so that they're not just rotting away and can perhaps get a job or have a skill when they left prison. But in large measure, these programs are often used as part of the security and punitive mechanisms in the prison - an additional tool for controlling, watching and punishing inmates, not educating or training them.

geez man

heck of a post

in my high school in east texas we had half a dozen campus police officers.  the one manning the gate to enter the school was shot because he mouthed off to the wrong drug dealer a couple of years after i graduated.  mostly they were there to try and keep tabs on the high school drug trade

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3 hours ago, toonkee said:

Cops do this stuff, shoot people, and punch and kick detained people, etc. because their egos were frustrated.  It's that simple and it's base human nature.  It's like a parent that loses it and smacks their kid when their ultimate authority is challenged.  

Another broad brush reactionary post. 

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4 minutes ago, AndroidAggie said:

geez man

heck of a post

I agree with social services dealing with things like addiction and mental health and domestic abuse and such instead of police, or at least dealing with it more than police. But unless drugs are legal, then it's going to go in a particular direction IMO.

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1 hour ago, misplacedcowboy said:

A graduate degree in social work only requires 30-60 credit hours. 

Not really sure I'd trust one more than a cop alone when dealing with a multi-faceted situation that may be endangering multiple people.

 

I'd trust my barber more than any public servant.

30 credit hours means what, 400 classroom hours? Plus ~1200 work hours? Plus ~200 final project hours, minimum?

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3 hours ago, renoskier said:

hey @soupslam1, I noticed you didn't try to tackle this question :shrug:

Because I already sarcastically alluded to the study as being poorly done without legitimate and thorough researched documentation. It obviously has a narrative to paint and an axe to grind as do many posting on this thread. 

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