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halfmanhalfbronco

Down goes the Standard Model of Particle Physics?

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Imperfect? Of course. Incomplete? Most likely. But "down?" Nope.

Classical physics has not properly described the behavior of subatomic particles for some time. But it still is a perfectly viable model that has allowed for us to develop everything from space travel to laser optics.

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17 minutes ago, TheSanDiegan said:

Imperfect? Of course. Incomplete? Most likely. But "down?" Nope.

Classical physics has not properly described the behavior of subatomic particles for some time. But it still is a perfectly viable model that has allowed for us to develop everything from space travel to laser optics.

 

SMoPP has not had real significant change since its inception.  This could lead to real significant change and force theory to be re-written.

The age of enlightenment lead to great advancement in understanding as well, before Einstein came and said they had it all wrong.

Next 5 years will be interesting as the rest of the data is realized.

 

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12 hours ago, halfmanhalfbronco said:

 

SMoPP has not had real significant change since its inception.  This could lead to real significant change and force theory to be re-written.

The age of enlightenment lead to great advancement in understanding as well, before Einstein came and said they had it all wrong.

Next 5 years will be interesting as the rest of the data is realized.

 

And I definitely I look forward to it. What we're able to observe - and have been - at the quantum level over the past couple decades is nothing short of mind boggling. And I too think the whole rule book will eventually be rewritten. 

But to suggest the sun has somehow set on classical physics when that rulebook enables scores of air and space missions and countless laboratory tests and experiments every day - including the engineering principles that went into the design and construction of every single piece of equipment used by Fermilab, CERN, and others - is not exactly accurate.*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Approx. 400 light years from accurate give or take a parsec or two.

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10 minutes ago, TheSanDiegan said:

And I definitely I look forward to it. What we're able to observe - and have been - at the quantum level over the past couple decades is nothing short of mind boggling. And I too think the whole rule book will eventually be rewritten. 

But to suggest the sun has somehow set on classical physics when that rulebook enables scores of air and space missions and countless laboratory tests and experiments every day - including the engineering principles that went into the design and construction of every single piece of equipment used by Fermilab. CERN. and others - is not exactly accurate.*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Approx. 400 light years from accurate give or take a parsec or two.

 

The setting sun has always been, again a when not if.  Standard model always had a sunset on, everybody knows it and looks forward to it.

While this may not be it, if findings in the next 5 or so years hold true, the Standard Model will absolutely need to be altered if not abandoned.  That has nothing to do with all the advances it's understanding has given us.  But it was always on borrowed time, and that was, or more accurately what is exciting about it.  

 

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8 hours ago, IanforHeisman said:

Read the first two paragraphs and I was lost already.. Stuff like this is fascinating but my brain just can’t compute it. I was reading about time dilation earlier and it’s still bizarre to me how 60 seconds here isn’t 60 seconds everywhere.

Idk if this is ground already covered, but if you're not already familiar with it, Columbia prof. Brian Greene does a phenomenal job of breaking down the fuzzy shit of quantum mechanics better than anybody in The Elegant Universe.

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15 minutes ago, TheSanDiegan said:

Idk if this is ground already covered, but if you're not already familiar with it, Columbia prof. Brian Greene does a phenomenal job of breaking down the fuzzy shit of quantum mechanics better than anybody in The Elegant Universe.

 

A book you may really like TSD is "The Quark and the Jaguar" by Murray Gell-Mann.

 

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