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Just now, retrofade said:

:rotflmfao:

When the flying FVCK did I become a Ben Shapiro clone? 

 

GIF by Steve Harvey TV

When you used the dumbass, incel phrase “roundly destroyed.” 
 

 A +++++ing retard can say something stupid and believe he “roundly destroyed” anyone. 

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Just now, Orygun said:

When you used the dumbass, incel phrase “roundly destroyed.” 
 

 A +++++ing retard can say something stupid and believe he “roundly destroyed” anyone. 

Dude. I'm sorry that you don't like facts, but you were skull fvcked on an hourly basis around here the last time you were an active poster. 

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6 minutes ago, retrofade said:

Dude. I'm sorry that you don't like facts, but you were skull fvcked on an hourly basis around here the last time you were an active poster. 

I consider the source.  Just because you douchebags are cavemen doesn’t mean you won arguments with doxxing and gifs.  

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13 minutes ago, Orygun said:

Why’d you bother to respond if you agree with me?  And when did I say surveys were perfect?  Do you always interject with irrelevant, dumb shit?

I was pointing out the issues with relying on surveys, as if they are infallible representations instead of a bunch of randos answering a weirdly worded question for 20 bucks; not just with accuracy, but also with projecting a very narrow question onto an entire concept. For one, ask 100 people whether they are an "above average driver" and you'll probably get 85 people saying "yes".

Treating a survey, today, in 2021 as if it is the be all end all of hesitancy, or anti vax sentiment vs deed in 2015 is... a take. 

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13 minutes ago, Orygun said:

When you used the dumbass, incel phrase “roundly destroyed.” 
 

 A +++++ing retard can say something stupid and believe he “roundly destroyed” anyone. 

sorry forgot you prefer "dodehahedrally destroyed"

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I was curious on this whole anti-vax culture.  

 

2018 NBC

Quote

“Since 2009, the number of ‘philosophical-belief’ vaccine nonmedical exemptions has risen in 12 of the 18 states that currently allow this policy: Arkansas, Arizona, Idaho, Maine, Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Utah.”

They found pockets in some big cities, too, including Seattle, Spokane, Houston and Kansas City.

 

180612-heat-map-county-level-nme-rates-e

 

That article is based on this report

Public Library of Science

 

Another report found higher incomes had higher anti-vax social media posting, and found that some blue states were also higher than national average (does not indicate political preference or racial makeup).

2018 NCBI

 

Quote

Abstract

This study examines temporal trends, geographic distribution, and demographic correlates of anti-vaccine beliefs on Twitter, 2009–2015. A total of 549,972 tweets were downloaded and coded for the presence of anti-vaccine beliefs through a machine learning algorithm. Tweets with self-disclosed geographic information were resolved and United States Census data were collected for corresponding areas at the micropolitan/metropolitan level. Trends in number of anti-vaccine tweets were examined at the national and state levels over time. A least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression model was used to determine census variables that were correlated with anti-vaccination tweet volume. Fifty percent of our sample of 549,972 tweets collected between 2009 and 2015 contained anti-vaccine beliefs. Anti-vaccine tweet volume increased after vaccine-related news coverage. California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania had anti-vaccination tweet volume that deviated from the national average. Demographic characteristics explained 67% of variance in geographic clustering of anti-vaccine tweets, which were associated with a larger population and higher concentrations of women who recently gave birth, households with high income levels, men aged 40 to 44, and men with minimal college education. Monitoring anti-vaccination beliefs on Twitter can uncover vaccine-related concerns and misconceptions, serve as an indicator of shifts in public opinion, and equip pediatricians to refute anti-vaccine arguments. Real-time interventions are needed to counter anti-vaccination beliefs online. Identifying clusters of anti-vaccination beliefs can help public health professionals disseminate targeted/tailored interventions to geographic locations and demographic sectors of the population.

 

 

Also, the google machine clipped to news from 2016-2019 has a lot of articles about Russian bots spreading an anti-vax campaign.   Perhaps they preyed on well-off but not formally educated folks who keep their eyes glued to their phone screens to sow mistrust in American medicine and public health?  Either way, I didn't see a plethora of evidence to say it was demarcated by political party.  Anecdotally, before COVID, I saw a mix bag of folks who were all about the health fads to be super-natural, folks who always held long-standing mistrust of government, folks who have a fear for medicine in general, and conspiracy theorists (not political-party based) as the anti-vax crowd, and it was very small in comparison to everyone I would encounter.  It is party line now, as folks who would get a flu shot in 2019 now won't get one.  I guess the Russians turned out some morons.  

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18 minutes ago, happycamper said:

I was pointing out the issues with relying on surveys, as if they are infallible representations instead of a bunch of randos answering a weirdly worded question for 20 bucks; not just with accuracy, but also with projecting a very narrow question onto an entire concept. For one, ask 100 people whether they are an "above average driver" and you'll probably get 85 people saying "yes".

Treating a survey, today, in 2021 as if it is the be all end all of hesitancy, or anti vax sentiment vs deed in 2015 is... a take. 

As opposed to blindly spouting assertions about “granola moms” when there is zero evidence that leftists are driving the anti-vax movement?

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1 hour ago, Orygun said:

That’s probably 10x the number of anti-vaccine granola moms.  So keep explaining why 60% of the GOP is anti-vax, while 90% of democrats (including “granola moms”) are already fully vaccinated.  
 

im all eyes. 

You are insane if you think there are only 5,000 gronala moms in the US that were skeptical of vaccines.  Shoot, that 50k number was likely eclipsed in California alone.

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1 hour ago, Orygun said:

Prior to covid is hardly relevant, is it?  How many hundreds of thousands did pertussis kill last year, you +++++ing idiot?

Well it is relevant when that was the statement in the post you quoted and took hubris with....That's, like, where YOU steered the conversation.  

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23 minutes ago, Orygun said:

As opposed to blindly spouting assertions about “granola moms” when there is zero evidence that leftists are driving the anti-vax movement?

I mean, the point was that prior to coronavirus being politicized, it was leftists driving anti-vax more than the right prior to trump.

And that wasn't a "blind assertion", it was built off of outbreaks of diseases that are part of our typical vaccination program, polls, and anecdotes. 
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/23/health/anti-vaccination-movement-us.html

Seven states reported rates for the M.M.R. vaccine that were far lower for kindergartners, including Kansas at 89.1 percent; New Hampshire, 92.4 percent; the District of Columbia, 81.3 percent. (The highest is West Virginia at 98.4 percent.)

ah, yes, liberal west virginia and notoriously conservative DC

https://qz.com/355398/the-average-anti-vaxxer-is-probably-not-who-you-think-she-is/

  • Liberal: 60% of anti-vaxxers describe their political leaning as liberal.

hmm....

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jul/30/jill-stein-green-party-vaccinations-anti-vaxxers

oh no, not noted conservative Green Party candidate Jill Stein!!!

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1 hour ago, Orygun said:

I consider the source.  Just because you douchebags are cavemen doesn’t mean you won arguments with doxxing and gifs.  

You were not destroyed by doxxing and gifs, you were clowned in any debate you participated in, and constantly corrected or proven wrong.  You got clown +++++ed.

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On 11/23/2021 at 4:15 PM, IanforHeisman said:

Pre Covid I think most anti vax people were far left granola types.. But Trump decided to make Covid political and instantly Republicans hated vaccines. Trump seems to have flip flopped a few times on his vax stance but the damage is done.

 

Poor, uneducated white people sure are a gullible bunch.

Jenny McCarthy exemplifies your first point. On your second point, McCarthy is white and having googled her, I learned she attended Southern Illinois University. Although she didn't graduate as she had to drop out "because of a lack of funds" (yeah, right), then "dropped out of nursing school to become an actress." She certainly isn't poor and has undoubtedly become rich solely because of her brilliant intellect.

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