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Corona Virus - How bad is it going to be?

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13 hours ago, 4UNLV said:

Any truth to this? higher premiums I understand, but denial? That would be especially brutal for those who tested positive but were asymptomatic.

 

 

Absolutely

No insurance for preexisting conditions. Life time limits. No limit for out of pocket. No free yearly screenings

Trump is trying to get the SC to reverse the ACA. All these nice provisions people like.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, UNLV2001 said:

Have to wonder on food driven obesity & cardiac deaths if the economic downturn plays a factor ( I think it probably does) as people eat fattier, less healthy foods - Right now pretty much every fast food chain has specials running like 2-1 burgers, so people load up on that for cheap 

Right but again healthcare costs play a role here also.   Using our 4 benchmark countries...

Per Capita Health Care costs (2017):

US: $10,224

Canada: $4,826

France: $4,902

UK: $4,246

So conservatively don't you think the typical family of 4 could spend the additional $20,800 on better food and a vacation rather than healthcare.  People cite lifestyle factors but discount how the steep rising cost of healthcare contributes to those lifestyle factors by squeezing other things, like quality food, out of the family budget.

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38 minutes ago, Bob said:

United States  non-hispanic white = 62.5%

UK white = 81.9%

Canada white = 83%

France white = 85% white

 

America is way more diverse than these countries

By how those European countries record demographics the U.S. would be 73% white. But of course the U.S. considers a white person of Hispanic descent a minority for, you know, reasons (that are dumb). 

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1 minute ago, sactowndog said:

Right but how many are stuck in bad jobs precisely because they need health care?  

Absolutely. Which is also what we are seeing in countless Covid cases right now. It's easy to say, "Wear your masks, avoid indoor settings!" Well, if your healthcare depends on your shitty job, and your shitty boss happens not to "believe" in the coronavirus, then good luck with that. The total dependence one's job and employer is part of the quality of life problem I mentioned above. Should have included that.

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3 minutes ago, sactowndog said:

Right but again healthcare costs play a role here also.   Using our 4 benchmark countries...

Per Capita Health Care costs (2017):

US: $10,224

Canada: $4,826

France: $4,902

UK: $4,246

So conservatively don't you think the typical family of 4 could spend the additional $20,800 on better food and a vacation rather than healthcare.  People cite lifestyle factors but discount how the steep rising cost of healthcare contributes to those lifestyle factors by squeezing other things, like quality food, out of the family budget.

No doubt the costs in the US & the way lots of people don't have insurance plays a big part 

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25 minutes ago, UNLV2001 said:


I'd go with there being more cars & drivers....though cars are much safer than they used to be plus seatbelts are prevalent now and not so much pre-1980's.

But what factors into average life expectancy is car deaths per capita, not absolute numbers. And per capita deaths are way, way down since their peak in the 70s. 

 

Quote

and since the 1970's the boom in processed & fast food chains - Used to be only the local drive in, then came everything under the sun as fast food.

Definitely. I follow this German YouTuber, don't ask me why. He's this 23 year old kid, used to rate fast food, talk about what he bought at the grocery store, and a bunch of video game crap. Basically spent his life in a chair. About a year ago, he had a come to Jesus moment and realized his life was in the crapper. He decided to cut the fast food and get out of the house. Today's videos are a difference like night and day. He used to have these weird lack of focus tics, slapping his forehead, making weird noises - you could tell his brain wasn't working right. Today, he's a fairly normal computer nerd. And it's not like he runs 5 miles a day now. He's still 250 pounds or whatever, and he still spends a ton of time in his gamer chair and his car. But the difference the better nutrition and a bit of exercise make is staggering.

By the way, this development isn't even a major theme of the channel. I'm not sure the guy even realizes just how much better he is than just a year ago. 

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21 minutes ago, mysfit said:

Absolutely

No insurance for preexisting conditions. Life time limits. No limit for out of pocket. No free yearly screenings

Trump is trying to get the SC to reverse the ACA. All these nice provisions people like.

Haven't they already tried that like a thousand times? What's different now?

 

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15 minutes ago, UNLV2001 said:

 

I'd go with there being more cars & drivers....though cars are much safer than they used to be plus seatbelts are prevalent now and not so much pre-1980's.............guns I'd put to just more guns laying around & not kept tucked away................and since the 1970's the boom in processed & fast food chains - Used to be only the local drive in, then came everything under the sun as fast food.

When I was in HS in Sparks NV, we only had a McDonalds.......I remember a Wendy's opening in 1978 and after that came the other FF chains - Reno / Sparks was pretty devoid of fast food chains in the 1970's............then boom, pizza, checken, burgers, hot dogs, etc etc.......................then factor in the US moved from a manufacturing based economy to a service economy and toss in the tech growth & computer based sedentary jobs. 

Right but I don't think proportionally from a comparative standpoint those things have changed much since 1979 to now so it would be hard to point to that as the difference.  To give you a sense of what has changed here is the list of per capita health care costs just from 2000.  Going from 1979 would be way more dramatic.

United States: $4,562

United Kingdom: $1,673

Canada: $1,999

France: $2,156

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43 minutes ago, sactowndog said:

So, how would you group Arabic people in those countries which are significant?  I am guessing Syrians would fall under your white category but may be just as different as hispanic whites in our country.   So your categorization is biased.   Also in the US your others are also poorer with less access to health care which is part of the systemic problem.   Your numbers on race are not necessarily causative.  But thank you for posting numbers and not just opinions. 

More stats:

U.S. state with lowest life expectancy: super diverse West Virginia at 74.79%
 

Other super diverse states with life expectancy under the U.S. average:

Kentucky: 75

Tennessee: 76

Arkansas: 75

 

The U.S. life expectancy is thankfully bailed out at the top by the classic homogeneous populations of states like Hawaii (82), California (81), and New York (81). 
 

Thoughts, @Bob?

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9 minutes ago, SalinasSpartan said:

More stats:

U.S. state with lowest life expectancy: super diverse West Virginia at 74.79%
 

Other super diverse states with life expectancy under the U.S. average:

Kentucky: 75

Tennessee: 76

Arkansas: 75

 

The U.S. life expectancy is thankfully bailed out at the top by the classic homogeneous populations of states like Hawaii (82), California (81), and New York (81). 

WV & KY might be tied directly to the cola industry - Mining & the health issues of coal mining..........for years Black lung was a major thing in coal country, not sure it's as bad as it once was.

Southern States always seem to lag in LE studies, probably tied to their diet (fried foods galore) and poverty rates 

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In a relevant anecdote I mentioned earlier that my wife’s coworker that shares he office tested positive a few months ago.
 

Well, she has tested positive again. That is after about 2 straight months of weekly negative results.

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3 hours ago, sactowndog said:

United States = 78.9

UK = 81.3

Canada = 82.4

France = 82.7

 

For comparison, a few others around the US average.

Costa Rica - 80

Chile - 80

Barbados - 79

Cuba - 79

Curacao - 78

Panama - 78

Uruguay - 78

https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.DYN.LE00.IN?locations=ZJ

Side note - The World Bank breaks out Puerto Rico separately from the US. It has Puerto Rico at 80 years; the US at 79.

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11 minutes ago, SalinasSpartan said:

More stats:

U.S. state with lowest life expectancy: super diverse West Virginia at 74.79%
 

Other super diverse states with life expectancy under the U.S. average:

Kentucky: 75

Tennessee: 76

Arkansas: 75

 

The U.S. life expectancy is thankfully bailed out at the top by the classic homogeneous populations of states like Hawaii (82), California (81), and New York (81). 
 

Thoughts, @Bob?

https://www.thebalance.com/which-states-have-the-best-economies-3980690

8 of the 10 listed here are all southern states..........and aside from New Mexico, all are sold republican states 

 

Rank State Median Income (2017) Comments
41 South Carolina $48,781

Dependence on agriculture

42 Oklahoma $49,767 Dependence on agriculture
43 Tennessee $48,708 Dependence on agriculture
44 New Mexico $46,718 Dependence on agriculture
45 Kentucky $46,535 Dependence on agriculture
46 Alabama $46,472 Dependence on agriculture
47 Louisiana $46,710 Oil
48 Arkansas $43,813 Coal
49 West Virginia $44,061 Agriculture
50 Mississippi $42,009 Agriculture
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1 minute ago, FresnoFacts said:

For comparison, a few others around the US average.

Costa Rica - 80

Chile - 80

Barbados - 79

Cuba - 79

Curacao - 78

Panama - 78

Uruguay - 78

https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.DYN.LE00.IN?locations=ZJ

Side note - The World Bank breaks out Puerto Rico separately from the US. It has Puerto Rico at 80 years; the US at 79.

Yes we are becoming more and more like a Latin America banana republic every day.

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1 minute ago, UNLV2001 said:

https://www.thebalance.com/which-states-have-the-best-economies-3980690

8 of the 10 listed here are all southern states..........and aside from New Mexico, all are sold republican states 

 

Rank State Median Income (2017) Comments
41 South Carolina $48,781

Dependence on agriculture

42 Oklahoma $49,767 Dependence on agriculture
43 Tennessee $48,708 Dependence on agriculture
44 New Mexico $46,718 Dependence on agriculture
45 Kentucky $46,535 Dependence on agriculture
46 Alabama $46,472 Dependence on agriculture
47 Louisiana $46,710 Oil
48 Arkansas $43,813 Coal
49 West Virginia $44,061 Agriculture
50 Mississippi $42,009 Agriculture

Arkansas as Coal?  Is you table off?

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1 minute ago, UNLV2001 said:

WV & KY might be tied directly to the cola industry - Mining & the health issues of coal mining..........for years Black lung was a major thing in coal country, not sure it's as bad as it once was.

Southern States always seem to lag in LE studies, probably tied to their diet (fried foods galore) and poverty rates 

True, but I don’t think Bob’s argument is helped by the fact that the top 3 U.S. states for life expectancy are among the most diverse, with Hawaii and California having minority-majority populations 

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JP Morgan analyzed card spending in different categories by state.

They found an uptick an in-person restaurant spending predicted an uptick in positive virus cases three weeks later.

Conversely, an uptick in grocery store spending predicticted a decline in cases.

Quote

An uptick in in-restaurant spending can predict an increase in COVID-19 cases over three weeks, according to a research note from J.P. Morgan.

"Looking across categories of card spending, we find that the level of spending in restaurants three weeks ago was the strongest predictor of the rise in new virus cases over the subsequent three weeks," wrote Jesse Edgerton, of the bank's economic and research department.

https://thehill.com/policy/finance/504709-in-restaurant-spending-can-predict-increased-covid-cases-jp-morgan

There is also a state by state chart at the link.

 

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