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Lester_in_reno

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About Lester_in_reno

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    Nevada
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    keeping it alive in the 775.

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  1. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    November 1918 A group of American soldiers ride in a truck, waving American flags during an Armistice Day parade , New York City. One soldier holds a sign reading 'To Hell With The Kaiser.'
  2. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    Allied troops continued to fight the war right up until armistice, with some new advances ordered that morning, even though the armistice was signed at 5:10 a.m. and the time of armistice was well known. A lot of people died for no particular reason before 11:00. Gen. Pershing will tell Congress a year from now that no one had informed him that the armistice was about to be signed, which is nonsense. Messages informing US units that the war would end at 11:00 failed to give any orders about what to do in the meantime, and different commanders made different decisions. Some wanted to be able to claim that their unit fired the last shots of the war. There were 11,000 casualties on all sides on November 11th before 11:00, more than on D-Day 1944.
  3. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    Headline of the Day -100: Kaiser Wilhelm and Crown Prince Friedrich Wilhelm go into exile in Holland. King Wilhelm II of Württemberg abdicates (no he doesn’t, but never mind). The kings of Bavaria and Saxony probably will soon, the NYT says (Ludwig of Bavaria fled but didn’t actually abdicate; I don’t think he ever actually did). Hesse-Darmstadt declares itself a republic.
  4. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    this from an awesome YouTube channel. Check this one out! The narrator/guy is Indy from Texas. The studio is in Sweden, lots of the staff Germans.
  5. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    Thanks to all who read and enjoyed this thread. It was just copying from blogs I read. The day to day news of the war put it into a different light--- the people back then were thrown into a wild situation. I think the masses were more easily led around, no radio yet....... all they had were newspapers, which were state controlled. Was an era where a soldier had to walk to and go force his will on his enemy. "OK Men , Go and attack that heavily fortified machine gun nest":! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11th November 1918: Military leaders, including Marshal Foch. Photo taken at 7:30 AM, outside the railway carriage where the First World War Armistice was signed (at 5:12 - 5:20 AM) , moments before Marshal Foch departed for Paris to hand the Armistice to the French Government. - Compiegne , France. Guns would stop 6 hours later at 11 AM - 11/11/1918
  6. Lester_in_reno

    OT: LET’S GO UMASS!!

    Meh. UMass football is not a big deal to the alums. ( I am one). Or to the state of Mass. They try to place some games Foxboro but the Boston area alums do not bite. Nobody freaking cares, -----It is not part of the self-esteem of the state of Massachusetts. but If the UMass basketball program wakes up the alums will be there for that.
  7. Lester_in_reno

    CSU at Nevada game thread.

    CSU didn't give a RATS ASS about this game !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I was there - everyone left at halftime!
  8. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    Apparently Trump wimped out on the WW`1 ceremony in France. All the other readers were there.... Way to rep Don !!! --------------------------------------------------------------------- PARIS — President Trump flew 3,800 miles to this French capital city for ceremonies to honor the military sacrifice in World War I, hoping to take part in the kind of powerful ode to the bravery of the armed forces that he was unable to hold in Washington. But on his first full day here, it rained on his substitute parade weekend. Early Saturday, the White House announced Trump and the first lady had scuttled plans, due to bad weather, for their first stop in the weekend’s remembrance activities — a visit to the solemn Aisne Marne American Cemetery, marking the ferocious Battle of Belleau Wood. It’s incredible that a president would travel to France for this significant anniversary — and then remain in his hotel room watching TV rather than pay in person his respects to the Americans who gave their lives in France for the victory gained 100 years ago tomorrow,” David Frum, who served as a speechwriter to former president George W. Bush, wrote in tweets. Trump is actually staying at the U.S. ambassador’s residence in Paris. So began a weekend in which Trump — battling on a number of political fronts in Washington — seemed distracted and disengaged. Trump left Washington as the list of White House worries piled up: newly empowered Democrats, criticism of his pick for acting attorney general and backlash over his personal attacks against journalists. Trump was in France in body but appeared unenthusiastic in spirit. The White House said Chief of Staff John F. Kelly and Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, would attend the Belleau ceremony in the Trumps’ absence, but Frum suggested Trump could have tried to scramble a motorcade to keep his schedule. Ben Rhodes, the deputy national security adviser under President Obama, noted he helped plan Obama’s foreign travel throughout his two terms and said it was common to have a backup plan to deal with inclement weather. “There is always a rain option. Always,” he wrote in a tweet. “Trump will use the U.S. military for a pre election political stunt but sits in his hotel instead of honoring those who fought and died for America.” The cemetery has 2,288 gravesites honoring those who died, including many Americans. The names of 1,060 more Americans who went missing and whose bodies were not recovered are engraved on the walls of the site.
  9. Lester_in_reno

    OT: LET’S GO UMASS!!

    Heh 4 point game. Almost halftime!
  10. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    Wilson is sending Herbert Hoover to Europe to organize food for the liberated areas. In the mean time, Hoover’s Food Administration asks Americans to give up “fourth meals” – afternoon teas, theater suppers. It says club lunches and the like should take the place of a meal rather than be an additional meal. Recommended: BBC documentary “WW I: The Final Hours,” available on the iPlayer and wherever those of us outside the UK go on the web to watch BBC documentaries. Watch it while ingesting your fourth meal.
  11. Lester_in_reno

    Fresno @ Boise

    what about the Bulldog receiver Johnson catching a long pass in-bounds from out of bounds?
  12. Lester_in_reno

    Fresno @ Boise

    wow the Bulldogs almost had them, but they couldn't drive the stake thru the heart. Good game to watch!
  13. Lester_in_reno

    Fresno @ Boise

    The fake FG IS more LOOKING STUPID all the time.........
  14. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    FYI the biggest WW 1 museum/monument in the USA is in Kansas City. what....KC MO? why? (I never knew about it until 4 years ago. when a traveling artifact exhibit came thru Reno) World War I, which set the stage for the world's geopolitics in the 20th and 21st centuries, ended Nov. 11, 1918, Armistice Day. Of the 40 million people who died in the war, 441 were from the Kansas City area. With so few casualties from this area, how did the United States' museum and memorial for this war end up here? Mike Vietti, the museum's marketing director, hears this question a lot. "This really was, in many respects, a crowdsourced National Museum and Memorial," Vietti says. 1918 in Kansas City The first two decades of the 20th century were a good time economically for Kansas City, which had a strong community of entrepeneurs and a growing middle class. The city's slogan at the time was "Make Kansas City a good place to live in." This concept was championed by a group of civic leaders who were in prime position to improve Kansas City's quality of life and make some money in the process: real estate developer J.C. Nichols; the livestock industry's Armour family; the bankers of the Kemper family; and regional lumber baron R.A. Long, among others. Agriculture was booming and Kansas City had become a shipping and railroad transportation hub. In the summer of 1914, when Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated and the rest of Europe broke out into war, Kansas City was gearing up to celebrate the opening of the newly built Union Station. Three years later, when the U.S. entered the war, Union Station became a central location for soldiers passing through for training and then shipping off overseas. Men enlisted, women entered the labor force, heartland-grown corn and grain were sent to feed troops abroad. Kansas City's garment district cranked out long johns for soldiers. Liberty bonds were sold. On November 11, 1918, the day the armistice was signed, Kansas City was in the midst of an influenza epedemic. Still, nearly 100,000 people flooded the streets of downtown for a victory parade. "The city was primed to do something big," says historian Bill Worley. Crowdsourcing, 20th century-style An estimated 100,000 people gathered for the opening celebration of the memorial on November 11, 1926. President Calvin Coolidge arrived by train at Union Station and made a speech dedicating the memorial as the national monument to the Great War. Credit National World War I Museum and Memorial Within a couple of weeks, Kansas City's civic leaders met to organize a way to memorialize those who served, including the 441 local soldiers who died. They started the Liberty Memorial Association. And in 1919, over the course of a 10-day fundraising campaign, 83,000 Kansas Citians collectively raised $2.5 million for the project. Today, that would be equivalent to about $35 million. Even school kids pitched in their nickels, says the memorial's education curator, Lora Vogt. World War 1 memorials were going up around the world. But what made Kansas City's monument unique was the quick, community-driven financing and the scope of the design. Organizers held a national architecture competition, and in 1921 the land was dedicated. It was chosen for symbolic reasons: to be across the street from Union Station. The grand opening celebration was in 1926, when President Calvin Coolidge addressed 100,000 people and called the memorial the national monument to the Great War. The symbolism of the tower The Liberty Memorial Tower is 217 feet tall and has one of the best views in the city. Around the top of the tower are four "guardian spirit" sculptures, and from the top emanates a steam and light display that looks like a flame. At the base of the tower are two exhibit halls. Two Assyrian sphinxes, wings shielding their faces, sit on either side of the tower. "The entire world was reshaped by what happened in World War I," says Vietti. That's why Vietti believes the memorial is so important. There was a rough time in the 1990s when the museum had to close in order to address long-needed renovations. A new sales tax and fundraising effort paid for updates to the memorial and a museum expansion. Architect H. Van Buren Magonigle and sculptor Robert Ingersoll Aitken collaborated to make four 'guardian spirits' near the top of the 217-foot-tall Liberty Memorial Tower. Credit Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3 In 2004, Congress designated it the National World War I Museum. Then in 2014, Congress declared it would be America's World War I Memorial. Meanwhile, plans for another National World War I Memorial in Washington D.C. are still in the works.
  15. Lester_in_reno

    World War 1. 100 years ago right now

    November 9, 1918. Kaiser Wilhelm II upon his arrival at the castle of Amerongen, Utrecht province in the Netherlands. He signed his abdication there and stayed until he moved to Huis Doorn in 1920. His arrival in Amerongen was a bit of a surprise to the people there and the phrase "Help, de Keizer komt!" (Help, the Kaiser comes!) became famous, not because they feared him but because he needed help to settle.
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